Wolf Alice front DIY’s July issue, the Latitude special edition

Wolf Alice front DIY’s July issue, the Latitude special edition

Wolf Alice front DIY’s July issue, the Latitude special edition

They’ve delivered the year’s defining debut, conquered US telly and Brixton Academy is in their sights – now Wolf Alice are on the cover of DIY’s July 2015 issue.

Out next Wednesday (24th June), free via UK stockists, online and on Apple Newsstand, the July issue finds a band going way beyond even the most far-fetched of expectations. They’re the group this generation’s been holding out for, and this month’s cover feature tracks their journey from haphazard beginnings to the real deal.

‘My Love Is Cool’ isn’t the kind of debut that lends itself to indifference. Even when they were patched together and taking on the road, Wolf Alice seemed different. Their songs were introverted things, coated in darkness, but they also had the potential to convert thousands. Big without being brash, anthemic without ticking boxes and sitting neatly outside of standard genre constraints, they were anything but ‘the usual bunch’. Their first work affirms this premonition and goes several steps further. Each song is steeped in nuances; together they kick and scream with the same feverish excitement. Oldies like ‘Bros’ and ‘Fluffy’ are reupholstered and transformed into bigger beasts. Previously discarded off-cuts like ‘Lisbon’ evolve into juggernauts. It’s easy to overdo the hyperbole when a new group points the way forward with such assurance, but this really does strike as a classic record. It’ll provoke and inspire anyone listening in, up there with ‘Silent Alarm’ and ‘Antidotes’ in the game-changing debut stakes. Somehow, it goes beyond the expectations they laid out from the beginning. Having a good cry at the end is probably doing it a disservice.

For those who’ve been following their every move from the start, Wolf Alice’s debut has been a long time coming. Two EPs (‘Blush’ and ‘Creature Songs’) sport enough songs to make up a record, but the demand’s been there for something bigger. “We weren’t ready, really,” admits Ellie Rowsell. “You think you’ve got loads of songs but then you realise some of them are skippers. I don’t think there are any skippers on this record.”

“It’s such a fickle day and age for music,” says Joel Amey, with Theo Ellis in agreement. “It’s because of the internet. You put out a song or a single, just because you want people to hear it. You don’t have any pre-conceived idea of an album at that stage. But everyone’s like ‘Oh, it’s the hot new band – have you got twelve more of these?’ We wanted to take some time and make sure we were proud of what we ended up putting out. That’s more important than rushing something. We’re lucky, to be fair. It’s great that people are still holding out for it. “

Read the full cover feature in July’s issue of DIY and online from Wednesday 24th June at 12pm GMT.

july2015_cover